MALDEF

MALDEF Responds to New Census Apportionment Figures

LOS ANGELES, CA - Today, the United States Census Bureau released its state-by-state total population results for the 2010 Census, and with them the number of seats each state receives in the U.S. House of Representatives under reapportionment for the 113th Congress, which convenes in January 2013.

The results show the U.S. population growth almost exclusively in the Western and Southern states, which led to Congressional gains in those states and losses in the Midwest and Northeast.

This growth corroborated the recently released 2009 ACS 1-year population estimates, which showed substantial growth of the Latino community in these same Western and Southern States since the 2000 Census.

"The Census will show that more than one in seven people in the United States is Latino. Today's data coupled with recently-released Census Bureau estimates demonstrate that the Latino population has significantly influenced how congressional seats are apportioned among the states. Further down the road, the nation can expect to see a minimum of nine additional Latino-majority House seats, provided that states comply with the federal Voting Rights Act in redistricting," said Thomas A. Saenz, MALDEF President and General Counsel.

  • The 2010 Census showed the nation grew 9.7% since 2000. Based on the Census Bureau's 2009 ACS 1-Year Estimates, the Latino population grew 37% from 2000 to 2009, where the non-Latino White population grew less than 3%. Stated otherwise, Latinos made up 51% of the United States total population growth, compared to non-Latino White population contributing 21% of the U.S. total population growth.
  • Based on the ACS data, in the following 16 states Latino population growth accounted for more than 60% of the state's total population growth: California, Connecticut, Illinois, Iowa, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas, and West Virginia. Latino population growth represents more than half the state's population growth in 21 states.
  • In the eight states that gained Congressional Districts under the 2010 Census, the 2009 ACS data show, with the exception of Florida and Texas, the Latino population grew more than 55%. In Texas and Florida, the Latino population grew a respective 37.16% and 48.82%. These relatively lower percentages represent large figures, with the states growing by 2,478,390 and 1,309,582 Latinos respectively.

"These data show that Latinos brought seats to states gaining districts, and prevented many other states from losing districts. As a result, the upcoming redistricting should be respectful of the growing Latino political strength," stated Nina Perales, MALDEF National Senior Counsel.

Other Notable Highlights:

  • Texas gained 4 Congressional Seats, showing a 21% population growth. According to the ACS, the Latino population grew 37% while the non-Latino White population grew 6%. This also shows that Latinos made up 63% of Texas's population growth.
  • California for the first time since 1930 did not gain a Congressional Seat. California grew 10% since 2000. The ACS showed a 25% growth in the Latino community, and a 3% loss in non-Latino White population; The Latino community represented 88% of the total population growth.
  • Arizona and Nevada each gained 1 congressional district, for total growth rates of 25% and 35%. Each state posted respective Latino population gains of 57% and 78% according to the ACS; which further represented 50% and 48% of each state‚Äôs population growth.
  • Florida gained 2 congressional seats with its 18% in total population growth. Florida posted a 49% Latino population growth via the ACS.

Copyright 2009 MALDEF — Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund